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tv   BBC News at Five  BBC News  December 4, 2017 5:00pm-6:01pm GMT

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today at 5: no breakthrough, yet, in the latest round of brexit talks. theresa may and jean—claude juncker say good progress has been made, but more talks are needed to iron out the remaining differences. we wa nt we want to move forward together, but on a couple of issues, some differences do remain, which require further negotiation and consultation. this is not a failure, this is the start. the irish border remains the main issue, with the dup saying they'll resist plans to align northern ireland regulations, with the rest of the eu. northern ireland must leave the eu on the same terms as the rest of the uk, and we will not accept any form of regulatory divergence which separates northern ireland economically or politically from the rest of the uk. so, the work goes on here in
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brussels, in the hope they can find that agreement by the time 27 eu leaders arrive here in brussels, in ten days' time. yes, plenty to talk about. we would bring you the latest analysis from brussels and westminster. the other main stories on bbc news at 5: nearly three—quarters of a million children and pensioners in the uk have fallen into relative poverty over the past four years. allegations about cabinet minister damian green... the head of the metropolitan police criticises two former officers for making public interventions. england take early australian second innings wickets, to give themselves the faint hope of a win in adelaide. our main story: the uk and european
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union have failed to reach agreement today on a way ahead in the brexit talks. theresa may said significant progress has been made. she was confident of a positive outcome, moore takes will take place later this week. the main issue? the tricky northern ireland border. we canjoin tricky northern ireland border. we can join christian fraser in brussels. yes, a lot of positivity and optimism around the place in brussels here this morning. i think there was a general feeling that they would find an agreement by the end of play today but that hasn't happened, so we are looking back at where it might have gone wrong. i think probably the british government thought they got an a cce pta ble government thought they got an acceptable form of words that was a cce pta ble acceptable form of words that was acceptable to the irish side. there was an emergency meeting in dublin
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this morning. there was a press conference scheduled. they were expected to say they were broadly positive about what was in the document but from that point on things seem to unravel. the wording in the document was leaked and then arlene foster apparently held a conversation with the prime minister, in this building behind me, made negotiation, that phone conversation went on for several minutes and then not long after that she appeared for a press conference, arlene foster ups, in which she was very firm that the form of words that was in the document at the moment was not acceptable. and when they came out from the talks with jean—claude juncker some minutes later there was —— it was clear there would be no deal today. theresa may arrived in brussels buzzing with speculation about the brexit deal. the atmosphere seemed positive. but neither side was giving anything away, as they headed into talks it was clear there was
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more work to do. the eu's demanded a framework deal on three areas. first, on the rights of eu nationals living in the uk after brexit, and of brits in europe. then money, what will britain to the eu when it leads? but the biggest stumbling block has been this question, what to do about the irish border. and hours later, it was confirmed, no today. ona today. on a couple of issues some differences remain, which require further negotiation and consultation, and those will continue, but we will reconvene before the end of the week and i am also confident that we will conclude this positively. the head of the european commission also seemed upbeat. we were narrowing our positions. today, thanks to the british prime minister and those in the eu to have a fair deal with
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britain. i the eu to have a fair deal with britain. lam the eu to have a fair deal with britain. i am still confident that we can reach sufficient progress before the european council on the 15th of december. for much of the day, all eyes had been an dublin, which insists there will be no eu— uk trade talks in west london guarantees there will be no hard irish border. we believe we have a responsibility to the island of ireland as a whole to the island of ireland as a whole to make sure we work with the british government to get a wording that can settle nerves on this issue, so as we that can settle nerves on this issue, so as we move that can settle nerves on this issue, so as we move into phase two, people notice that the result, even if it is an unintended consequence, isn't going to be a hard border. once there were customs posts on these border roads and in the irish republic there is concern brexit could see them brought back, hampering trade. this particularly agricultural trade between the north and south of the island. it's been suggested in an agreement could be
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reached on aligning regulations on both sides of the border, but some say that as weakening northern ireland's position in the uk. this northern ireland must leave the european union blitz the european union on the same terms as the rest of the uk and we will not accept any form of regulatory divergences schlep rates northern ireland politically or economic live from the rest of the uk. the constitutional integrity of the united kingdoms not be compromised. andy king northern ireland could get special treatment has opened another can of worms. nicola sturgeon suggested there was surely no good practical reason why other parts of the uk couldn't get a similar deal, like scotland, or wales. the welsh first minister said he would fully expect to get the same offer. and why not wonder, says the mayor sadik khan? too, in his words, protect tens of thousands ofjobs. it's for
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now, the divorce deal is still up in the airand now, the divorce deal is still up in the air and despite the progress made, it is no less controversial. maybe a case of two steps forward and one step back this afternoon. joining me now is our brussels reporter adam fleming. where do you think it went wrong? i've been speaking to some of the diplomats from the member states who was sitting in that room in that building over there, the european council building, from 2:30pm, expecting to be briefed on the commission by progress and to see this document both sides had been working on which would lay out all the concessions and commitments and promises on pledges each side had made to get the talks moving. they started going home to do the school run, leaving the diplomatic dinners they had to go to and after a few hours they were told the meeting
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was off today when her number wise. the theory from them is the major sticking point was ireland. they say, look at the statements that came from this arlene foster in belfast and nicola sturgeon in scotland, saying this will be a problem if they go down this route of promising that northern ireland will, in some way, stick very closely to the rules of the single bark and the customs union. that seems to be proof of the political problems that would cause for theresa may are now we hear this theresa may are now we hear this theresa may are now we hear this theresa may called arlene foster and then had to go back into the ring to presidentjean—claude juncker and said we couldn't do a deal today. there will have to be conversations with other devolved governments. it was interesting that she talked to arlene foster in the course of negotiation with jean—claude juncker. it caught me by surprise. i thought there was so much done over the weekend with the irish government, you would have thought the dup would have been kept in the loop. this has been carefully choreographed so you would expect that to have been factored in, so people are surprised that was the spammer in the works. there is another theory that it is a necessary spanner another theory that it is a necessary spanner in the works on just how politics works in northern ireland and the republic of ireland
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means people have a bit of the strop every now and then to prove something to their voters and help the process along. and even though we are talking about ireland, if you diplomats have said to me, don't underestimate this the problem of the european court ofjustice. that is still a big sticking point, i think. people were saying and the whole citizens rights thing, that's been solved, but there is still a sticking point for the european court ofjustice. sticking point for the european court of justice. and sticking point for the european court ofjustice. and quite a big sticking point. some people were thinking when he was ladling theresa may with praise at the start of his press
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conference that that was what he was doing. i'm thrown a promise that with him for hours and emerged with nothing, effectively. '5 the relationship has improved somewhat since the summer when he when he said he left london more pessimistic than when he arrived. thank you very much indeed, adam. the work goes on in brussels. michel barnier and david davis have been meeting on the sidelines of these talks. and the prime minister the signals people we re prime minister the signals people were taking was the opposite, was trying to sweeten the pill for her and make it look a little less humiliating, about the fact she had thrown a promise that with him for hours and emerged with nothing, effectively. the relationship has improved somewhat since the summer when he said he left london more pessimistic than when he arrived. thank you very much indeed, adam. the work goes on in brussels. michel barnier and david davis have been meeting on the sidelines of these talks. and the prime minister has gone into a meeting this evening with donald tusk, unique eu council time to put their documents together, to put a brief together for the 27 eu leaders then we move onto the 14th of december and we will see if we get an they have time to put their documents together, to put a brief together for the 27 eu leaders and then we move on to the
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14th of december and we will see if we getan 14th of december and we will see if we get an agreement many thanks to the latest in brussels. christian fraser with adam fleming. let's recap for a moment, because lots of happened in the last girls. that intervention from claiming they done on any kind of agreement which in rest of the causes a separation in regulations between northern ireland and the rest of the notjust that factor that was a very clear message from arlene foster. but as adam said, is notjust that factor today. and laura kuenssberg and laura it's also to do with saying it's also to do with the crucial an issue which remains to be citizens rights, which doesn't been sorted out any still an issue which remains to implementation period. this is not just about the question of the irish border. this sorted and the role of the european courts in any kind of transitional implementation period. this is not just transitional implementation period. this is notjust about the question of the irish border. this crucial though that is. we can speak to brian hayes, an irish mep from the ruling party in the republic of ireland fine gael. he's in brussels. what have you made of today's event so what have you made of today's event so far? there is a disappointment around brussels, that we haven't managed to conclude all of the negotiation by this evening. but i
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think a lot of progress has been made. i think you're right in highlighting this isn't just made. i think you're right in highlighting this isn'tjust about ireland and the question what have you made of today's event so far? there is a disappointment around brussels, that we haven't managed to conclude all of the negotiation by this evening. but i think a lot of progress has been made. i think you're right in highlighting this isn't just about ireland you're right in highlighting this isn'tjust about ireland and the question of between the republic and northern there are some outstanding issues around the the role of the ecj. eu citizens living in the uk and the role of the ec]. i think presidentjean—claude juncker made it we have another ten days to go before the european council meeting we have another ten days to go before the european council meeting in to give a resolution where if they see sufficient progress. i think we're heading in the next 48 hours, three days maximum, to try and get these matters resolved, because that is the kind of time frame we we have a meeting of the european parliament next week, which will have to give a resolution where if they see sufficient progress. will have to give a resolution where if they see sufficient progresslj think we're heading in the next 48 hours, three days maximum, to try and get these matters resolved,
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because that is the kind of time frame we i think i'm right in saying we are expecting leo varadkar, foreign minister to give a news conference within the next few minutes, and if that comes up we will go to a sense of you from what you expect them to be saying, in light of the intervention by the dup earlier this i expect leo varadkar and the foreign minister to make clear a number of to come to an agreement. it's an island firstly a lot of progress has been made and we stand ready to come to an agreement. it's an island interest to go from phase one to face two this talks process because we want do that. i suspect leo varadkar will save more time is needed, more time is needed. but ultimately we have made progress with the british government over the course of the last number of days especially, in making sure that the north—south component of this and sta ble north—south component of this and stable relationship the uk. is crucial for ireland north and south to do that. i suspect leo varadkar will safe more time is needed, more time is needed. but ultimately we have made progress with the british government over the course of the last number of days especially, in making sure that the north—south component of is strong and robust. the good friday agreement, which is
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absolutely the case constitutionally between both parts of ireland and both there remains in place and there were firm commitments given in there were firm commitments given in the good friday agreement about the north—south bodies, north—south ministerial council and the north—south things we do best it remains in place and there were firm commitments given in the good friday agreement about the north—south bodies, north—south ministerial council and the north—south things we do best, things an energy motor, the question of road safety, these are things i, the question of road safety, these are things people in northern ireland, want answered. that's why we were very clear and the requirement for regulatory alignment, so that in the same way that different parts of the uk can transpose existing eu regulations, so transpose existing eu regulations, so the irish government, and the great majority of people in northern ireland, want answered. that's why we we re very ireland, want answered. that's why we were very clear and the requirement for regulatory alignment, so that in the same way that different parts of the uk can transpose existing eu regulations, so can transpose existing eu regulations, so can in the future, if it had a think the northern ireland's say, this is a win—win or, if we can get a deal across the and an assembly working. so i think the northern ireland's say, this is a win—win, if we can get a deal northern ireland on the timings, donald tusk saying in the last minute or so that in his view, the time for a brexit deal“
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getting extremely tight, but he thinks an agreement next week is still possible. if that is the case and if you agree with that, what form of agreement could there be, given what the dup has said today about not wanting any kind of separation in regulation terms between northern ireland and the uk? where is there room for compromise? i think we need to get back to the good friday agreement, which sets out very clearly the work that has to be done on an all ireland basis, that was the basis of the good friday agreement. if we had a functioning northern ireland with the assembly up and running we could get a good outcome to the negotiations when it comes to north—south co—operation. i also think it is very clear, and the british government i think were prepared to concede this, much firmer language in phase one about the question of no hardboard arts and also about question of not moving to a new system until we get firm commitments that that system is not going to impinge on the people in ireland, north or south. i hope we can still get there and i hope
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thatis we can still get there and i hope that is the ambition of the dup this but the irish government is up to this. we want to move onto the next phase and that is very clear in everything our taoiseach has set up until now. very good of you to join us, thank you very much. that is brian hayes, who is in brussels for us. brian hayes, who is in brussels for us. we are still expecting the news conference in government buildings in dublin in the next few minutes or so. in dublin in the next few minutes or so. this is where we are expecting the taoiseach and foreign minister, who are just the taoiseach and foreign minister, who arejust coming the taoiseach and foreign minister, who are just coming in right now. how's that for tightening? let's join this news conference. thank you very much. i want to make a brief statement on developments today in the brexit talks. the cabinet met this morning to discuss progress on brexit, and in particular on issues of direct releva nce to particular on issues of direct relevance to northern ireland. that followed a period of very intense
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negotiations between the british government and the eu task force, with the substantial involvement of the irish government. it was supplemented by intensive contacts between the irish and british governments over the last few days. those talks have made substantial progress on a number of issues that are very important to us. first of all, a shared commitment that the achievements and benefits and commitments of the peace process will remain of paramount importance. the sharing commitment to the good friday agreement and all its parts, protecting north—south co—operation, the continuation of the common travel area, so that there will be no change to the rights of british and irish citizens to travel, live, work, access health care, education, housing and welfare in each other‘s countries as though they are citizens of both. respect for island's continued membership of the european union, including the internal market and the customs union. the rights of irish citizens in northern ireland, will continue to be eu citizens after brexit. if
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the continuation of eu peace funding and the protection of the provisions of the good friday agreement and rights, safeguards and equality. the most difficult issue we faced was to obtain a cast—iron agreement and a written guarantee that there will not be a hard border on the island of ireland after brexit. this island of ireland after brexit. this is not a new issue, nor has it been given greater prominence in recent weeks, as some people have suggested. it has been to the absolute forefront of ireland's concerns since before the referendum in the united kingdom. if i want to offer the reassurance that there is no hidden agenda here. our only guiding light is the good friday agreement. which clearly states the constitutional status of northern ireland cannot be changed without the consent of the people of northern ireland, and this is fundamental to our position. we do not want a border in the irish sea any more than we want to border
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between heavy in derry. following the government meeting this morning, the government meeting this morning, the irish negotiating team received confirmation from the british government and the barnier task force at the united kingdom had agreed text on the border that met our concerns. this text would form parts of the broader eu — uk agreement on phase one would allow us agreement on phase one would allow us to move on to face too. i was then contacted by the president of then contacted by the president of the european commission, president john kerr, and the president of the european council, president donald tusk and confirmed to them both ireland's to that text. i am surprised and disappointed that the british government now appears not to be ina british government now appears not to be in a position to conclude what was agreed earlier today. i accept that the prime minister has asked for more time. and i know that she faces many challenges, and i
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acknowledge she is negotiating in good faith. but my position and that of the irish government's is unequivocal and it is supported by all of the parties, and i believe the majority of people on these islands. this ireland wants to proceed to face two. it is very much in our interests to do so. however, we cannot agree to do this unless we have firm guarantees that there will not be a hard border in ireland, under any circumstances. i've spoken to presidentjuncker again in the last half an hour and he has confirmed to me that ireland's position remains europe's position, andi position remains europe's position, and i still hope this matter can be concluded in the coming days, as was you. thank you, taoiseach. can you explain the difference to us. there is some confusion over regulatory
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alignment and divergence. one would have stricter controls, the alignment on is perhaps skirting around the edges a little bit more. ona around the edges a little bit more. on a slightly more frivolous note, your sartorial choice for this morning's cabinet meeting has gone around the world. i think we will stick to the serious questions but today, if that is ok. to a nswer questions but today, if that is ok. to answer your question, when it comes to avoiding regulatory divergence or maintaining regulatory alignment, those two things mean the same in ourview alignment, those two things mean the same in our view and we're happy to accept either terms in the that was made. taoiseach, it seems from what happened today that theresa may did not consult with the dup before travelling to brussels today. is that your understanding of it? have you spoken to arlene foster today or do you intend to speak to her to see
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what the blockage is on their part? sammy wilson has been out today describing the irish government as little more than a bunch of chances with the republican agenda, how would you respond that rhetoric question up i suppose it's not for me to speak for prime minister may and who she spoke to or not. one side we were very much involved with was the task force, and the uk government on the other. we had some direct contact as well between officials from the average government and officials from the uk government, as well. i think it is important that we listen to the dup. i haven't had any direct contact with them in recent days. it is important we listen to them but it's also important to bear remind this they are just one party in northern ireland. there are other parties in northern ireland as well, and we need to have regard to what all of the party think in northern ireland and also the majority of people in northern ireland. that has always been our approach to this. in terms
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of comments from anyone else questioning our motivations, i can absolutely assure you the motivations of the irish government have always been this to try and maintain the status quo that exists on the island of ireland than between ireland in britain as much as possible. all we ever wanted is people to be able to continue to go about their normal lives, to cross the border as they do now, to trade as they do now. that is our only objective. we're not looking to pick a row with anyone, we're not looking to advance any sort of hidden agenda here. it's always only ever been about the best interests of the irish people north and south of the border, and allowing people to live their lives and carry out their businesses as they have been for 20 yea rs businesses as they have been for 20 years now. taoiseach, can we just pressure point... did the government believe the dup was onside or what was agreed between brussels, london and dublin question they are the ones that have derailed this is sleeping. can you that question? given that theresa may cannot follow through on what was agreed, how can
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you trust in any these negotiations for a successful conclusion? it was never our role to make sure the dup was onside or that the conservative party was onside or any of those issues. the negotiations that we engaged in, we engaged in this in good faith, with the eu and the task force on one side and the uk government on the other. the responsibility i had at this government had was to ensure that the government of ireland could agree a text. we agreed that text this morning, got cabinet approval for it in principle and briefed the opposition parties today. that is the agreement that we had. we believe it stands, but we understand that the prime minister needs a bit more time, and i do trust and believe she is negotiating in good faith and we're happy to allow her more time, if that's what's needed. there is plenty of time between now and it's the of december.
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on that point, just to back it up. these are structured negotiations. they are not, the wording that was agreed today didn't come because of conversations between political parties over the phone. this they have been negotiating teams in place for weeks now, trying to work through these key issues that we have genuine concerns about. issues that by the way have also been raised in westminster, through the brexit committee, asking for questions to the questions we have been asking. this and so, it's actually true that negotiating structure, that we have worked up a d raft structure, that we have worked up a draft that we were able to conclude this morning with political agreement on. that was confirmed, as i say, as the taoiseach has said, with the president of the commission and the president of the council. so effectively, the deal was done this.
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and since then, obviously, there's clearly been a request for more time, in orderfor that deal to be confirmed. i don't think we should give the impression this was somehow an ongoing conversation between political parties, there are lots of parties in northern ireland. they'll need to be part of the conversation, and toa need to be part of the conversation, and to a certain extent they been. inaudible the taoiseach and i are at one on this. we had a deal today, in relation to a wording that in our view would provide reassurance, for many people who were concerned about the potential re—emergence of the border on the island of ireland. as an unintended consequence, because i don't believe anybody wants a hard border on the island of ireland, the british government doesn't want
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that, we don't want that, but i think we needed a credible way in which we could ensure that that was avoided. i believe we got a wording that achieved that today, and so we wa nt to that achieved that today, and so we want to ensure that that wording remains intact, said that whatever happens we move on to phase two, if we move on to phase two, with the assurance there is not going to be under any circumstances a hard border re—emerging on the island. i think we have an obligation to ensure that is the case. yes, we've agreed a text, a text that was agreed by the uk government and agreed by the eu task force, and that text gives us the assurance that text gives us the assurance that we need, that even as an unintended consequence there will not be a hard border on this island and gave little —— gave us the
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assurances we need around citizens rights. we understand the prime minister needs a bit more time and the talks will continue later in the week. it is still our view this can be concluded before the summit on the 14th of december. studio: the latest reaction in government buildings in dublin, the taoiseach and foreign minister giving their response to this afternoon's developments. simon jack is with me. that was a very significant intervention by both of these leading politicians, wasn't it? they are effectively saying they thought the deal was done, they thought the deal was done, they thought the deal was done, they thought the deal was in place and what's happened today has surprised and disappointed them. what is your reading of it? nobody wants a hard border this, anyone. businesses don't. 37 thunderball northern irish exports go to the republic. there was this a language about regulatory alignment, which when things could carry on as if they were until a long time into the future. the
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problem with that is it potentially sets northern ireland are slightly different economic trajectory to the rest of the uk, and in a way they are being more closely bound to the republic than it is the rest of the uk. which is what the dup don't want. the dup made their displeasure with that perfectly. it is unclear from the sequencing whether they hadn't seen that language, because they broke off to have that conversation, which seems amazing, or they hadn't bought it through and what it meant for the regular and economic direction of the country, but clearly you could see jean—claude juncker was also disappointed. i think theresa may isn't going to want to come back having thrown that way... we were all geed up and ready. they said it wasn't just that. all geed up and ready. they said it wasn'tjust that. whether all geed up and ready. they said it wasn't just that. whether that all geed up and ready. they said it wasn'tjust that. whether that is just trying to lessen some of the impact of what looks like a bit of a hash remains to be seen. they're all sorts of problems. we've seen today, tea m scotla nd sorts of problems. we've seen today, team scotland saying if you can have a soft brexit border with northern ireland, we will have one of those
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as well. thus the london mayor saying we will have a bit of that as well. you have of those concerns. and also the world trade organisation are in a position where if you have a bit of the uk offering a trade deal, if you like, to the republic of ireland, you have to offer the same terms under wto rules, including brazilian farmers in us funds, which at the moment, our industries, for example agriculture, have been protected by those external factors by their mention to the eu. it feels that one step forward and two back. interesting, thank you. let's go straight to westminster. let's go straight to westminster. let's cut to the heart of this. do you think theresa may had not squared off the dup on this or what has happened ? squared off the dup on this or what has happened? we cannot get to the bottom of that is i have spoken to the dup today, they said they were
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in discussions all weekend, as far as they are concerned they have the british government they will not go along with regulatory alignment, they understand the british government were never going to accept that because it went against what the british government were saying publicly and what downing street said this morning which is what we are leaving european union as one, the united kingdom is one and there will not be different. i understand theresa may went into that lunch and the dup, having heard the ramping up of expectations this morning, particularly from brussels and from dublin, they were concerned theresa may would come under pressure to cave in and deliberately timed eileen foster's intervention to show they were not happy —— arlene foster. it seems that the language was not soft enough for them. what it was supposed to give them. what it was supposed to give the impression of is that if they
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cannot get any kind of trade deal, crashed out without a deal, there will be no hard border. it clearly wasn't drafted in a way the dup were happy with. there's clearly a com plete happy with. there's clearly a complete different version of events coming out of dublin there. the british government here, downing street saying it is notjust the issue of northern ireland and the irish border, there are other issues to deal with. the european court of justice, citizens rights which is an issue for some in the conservative party. a difficult day. this morning, downing street were more cautious that brussels' deadline is 14-15 cautious that brussels' deadline is 14—15 december so there will argue there with more —— still time to go into the next date. while reaction to come from the news conference in dublin but also to be events in brussels today where agreement seemed to be in reach of getting onto the next phase of talks on
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brexit until that news conference with the dup in northern ireland where they made plain that they did not the smell of the deal that was cooked up. more reaction to come after we have the news headlines. the latest on the sport as well. that's driving ban for the weather. good evening. it's been a quiet day, it'll stay quiet tomorrow. then things changed quite a lot later in the week. during tonight, it's pretty much plain sailing, dry weather, some clear spells but large amounts of cloud dripping in from the west. producing the odd spot of patchy rain and breezy with some persistent rain in the far north. most persistent rain in the far north. m ost pla ces persistent rain in the far north. most places avoiding fast but it is see breaks in cloud for any length of time, temperatures the get away and some fog patches. tomorrow, cloudy but we will see breaks for central, eastern and southern parts. more persistent rain into north—west scotla nd more persistent rain into north—west scotland where turns wendy, temperatures 8—10d. wednesday will
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bea mild temperatures 8—10d. wednesday will be a mild day and windy as well, gales in the west potentially as outbreaks of rain spread from the atlantic. double digit temperatures but they won't last. a mild start on thursday, wind and rain clearing and bend the end of the week, turning colder with wintry showers that could bring snow just colder with wintry showers that could bring snowjust about anywhere. the time is 5:34pm and these are the headlines. no breakthrough today in the brexit talks. theresa may and jean—claude juncker say progress has made but more talks are needed iron out the differences. we want to move forward together but on a couple of issues, some issues do remain which require further consultation. the irish border remains the main issue, the dup in northern ireland saying
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it will resist all plans to align the north and regulations there with the north and regulations there with the rest of the eu and in the past few minutes, the taoiseach in dublin has said he wants talks to progress but barriers remain. an additional 700,000 children and pensioners in the uk have fallen into relative poverty in four years according to a social policy charity. allegations about damian green ahead of the metropolitan police exercising two former officers for their public interventions. at 5:35pm let's catch up interventions. at 5:35pm let's catch up with the day before transport and jointjessica. good afternoon. day three of the second ashes test started horribly for england but stood finished better. they lost a succession of wickets with some moments of brilliance for australia, moeen ali caught and bowled and mitchell starc removejonny bairstow in the same way, reacting incredibly quickly. england all out and over,
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200 runs behind the aussies. they made the best possible start with the ball. james anderson struck early to remove cameron bancroft. four wickets in the later session including steve smith. australia finishing the day 53—4, their lead 268 so very much in control. we fought back well. request australia back to about which is good to see. we will take positives from. —— we pushed australia back. we are behind in the game but we fought back and showed character to get ourselves backin showed character to get ourselves back in the game. we bowled well tonight as a unit. we put pressure back on australia. alex hales can now be considered for selection for england's team in australia. he is no longer a suspect regarding the
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issue in bristol in september. him and ben stokes were suspended and now he has been told he is only a witness and will face no criminal charges but can still be punished by the ecb. paul pogba will serve a three match ban for the red card for stamping on hector bellerin of arsenal. united decided not to appeal against the he will miss the manchester derby on sunday as well as well as the next you are the games against bournemouth and west brom. gareth southgate has been told hisjob is safe brom. gareth southgate has been told his job is safe even brom. gareth southgate has been told hisjob is safe even if brom. gareth southgate has been told his job is safe even if his side loses every world cup game. he signed a four year deal and fa say he will be in charge for the next few tournaments. they say they are having a long—term plan and are seeing results with world cup success for the under 17 and under 20 side. it has been a announced the bbc will show england's first two group matches. they will be live across tv, radio and online. and the
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first choice of quarterfinal games including england's match if england progress. british gymnastics have confirmed their coat eddy ben arous who was the technical director has been suspended after allegations of misconduct. he won a coaching award last year following the team achievement he won a record seven medals at the rio games. an independent investigation is underway. top seed judd trump has been knocked out of the uk to the leg snooker championship in york beaten 6—2. the world number 21 the first two frames but spent much of the match on his seat. scotland was ‘s player took the next six to move into the next round. two time champion mark williams is out. he was beaten by ryan day who recovered from 4—1 down to win 6—5. that is
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all sport for now, more on our website. more for you in sports day at 6:30pm. lots happening today in those brexit negotiation. talking about the state of the talks in brussels. the fact they have not come to an agreement today, still searching for a solution for the status of northern ireland or the border between northern ireland and the republic. in any overall agreement. to recap, and talk us through the element here, michael vick chris morris is here from the bbc‘s reality check. let's start with the irish border, where are we today quiver with a bit of a —— a bit of ——a bit ofa —— a bit of a roller—coaster today, there was a clear attempt today to find that form of words to allow both sides to agree that there
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should be similar rules and regulations on both sides of the irish border after brexit. once great britain and northern ireland have left the single market and the customs union. they have different rules and regulations, that's when they have border checks. it appeared mid—morning: lunchtime, that that was going well but suddenly, the dup, the government allies in northern ireland, made a strong statement not accepting any kind of divergence of regulations. ironic of course, that it takes us back once again to the election earlier this year that theresa may called to give her a stronger hand in the brexit negotiations, is now making it more difficult because she has to go back to talk to the dup and square that circle. that part again, more talks on that. did they settle other issues, we have talked about financial colder regions, the divorce payments, have been agreed on that? —— financial contribution. not much. the divorce payment is the
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least important thing of the day. it appears to be the one place significant progress was made. when people say have we reached deal, this is a deal that sufficient put—downs has for about —— sufficient progress has been made to goad to talk about the future. we know there is a range potentially on who you talk to between 40—50, possibly 55 billion euros that will be paid if that happens well into the future. it will be difficult to come up with a precise number. at the moment, and things can change, if the three initial issues, that seems to be the one in the best place but watch this space. the other big issue was the right of eu citizens, certainly those remaining after brexit and citizens elsewhere after the process gets underway. have resettled any of that? this is still a problem. a few
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days after the referendum, both sides said they wanted to sorted quickly. there will be a legal difficulty with who will underpin any arrangement in the future, the european court of justice? any arrangement in the future, the european court ofjustice? that has not been resolved. the eu say if there is an agreement and an eu citizen here wants to make a claim about something that has gone wrong with that agreement, they should have the right to at least have the european court of justice have the right to at least have the european court ofjustice involved in some form. they are trying to find a way around but it's difficult. the other thing on citizens rights which are still an issueis citizens rights which are still an issue is at the moment, eu citizens have the right to bring spouses and other dependents into this country. they want that to continue after brexit, which is something that has to be negotiated. doesn't have to be finalised, it is meant to be sufficient progress, that there are things nailing to be as well. lots of talk about need to be ironed out. can we expect
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a breakthrough in these areas? it's the next step. we heard from jean—claude juncker, they need something for leaders to agree out at the next summit, and if things go well, sufficient progress will be declared and there will be negotiating guidelines for the eu to considerfrom mr donald tusk, the european council president, on the potential future transition and the talked about the future arrangement about trade or security and other things. there is a lot in there that could go wrong, a lot of challenges involved in putting together a decent transition and certainly in terms of the future relationship, the whole of the economy, the whole of the relationship with the eu, and many cases around the world. there are hundreds and hundreds of
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agreements the uk is a part of it is the member of the eu. the eu membership lapses, we need to renegotiate those in some form. there's an awful lot to do. we will talk more. taking us there on where we are now. what happened at brussels and was the sequence of events that? david is a politico's chief correspondent who is following the events today. thanks forjoining us. give us your reading about your leg what ? your reading about what happened today? we don't have significant process on the divorce issues. as you had at the top of the show, with allies, political allies like these, theresa may does not need enemies. she was tripped up by the dup, the inability to come to an agreement, essentially internally within domestic politics, this is tough. they are going to try again later
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this week but every day that goes on is harder and harder. is the reading their mind you and your colleagues that theresa may somehow did not properly square the dup today or did something move that was outside the prime minister's control? no, this issueis prime minister's control? no, this issue is just devilishly hard. the eu insists the northern ireland should not be treated differently from the uk. —— the rest it is hard not to treat northern ireland at least some differently. it is growing a circle. this is excruciatingly difficult to solve. i'm wondering what chances do you give of some kind of meaningful advance later this week when those talks reconvene? it seems very slim. u nless talks reconvene? it seems very slim. unless there is a complete reversal, the dup being willing to cave in on
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its position now, it's hard to see how things change tomorrow, the day after, council president donald tusk says that is still time for its getting tired but he still can pull off guidelines in time for the eu leaders summit on 14—15 december. but there has to be movement and it does not seem at this moment that this site are willing to agree. setting the irish question to one side for the moment, we still have eu citizens‘ rights and the role of european courts in a post—brexit world. do you think those are relatively easy to resolve? logistically, there are somewhat easier. the island, northern ireland border is a particular problem. but we had very sober notes from members of the european parliament this morning saying they were not happy what with how things were going on citizens rights, the continued jurisdiction of european court of justice is a problem for brexit
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supporters and the longer any one of the remains unresolved, the harder it is to wrap things up. you think you have a deal on one and then it comes undone because the package is still not finalised. thanks for joining us. sure thing. the latest thoughts on what has been going on in those pretty complex and high sta kes in those pretty complex and high stakes negotiations today. let‘s look at some of the day before the other main story. the metropolitan police commissioner cressida dick has criticised two former senior police officers for disclosing that an investigation on damian green. they claimed pornography was found ona they claimed pornography was found on a computer seized from the office nine years ago, mr green denies watching or downloading pornography on the computer. our correspondent is at new scotland yard. what i spent saturday and cressida dick‘s intervention here, tell us more? ——
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what has been said today. this is a significant statement making clear that she won‘t tolerate officers all former officers who disclose confidential information arising from an enquiry in a public way. she has made that clear in her statement andi has made that clear in her statement and i think she was really referring to those two men, bob quick and neil lewis. bob quick confirms the story in the sunday times last month disclosing allegedly that pornography was found on damian green‘s computer. neil lewis gave an interview to the bbc last week and disclose further details. cressida dick said today that both men could be prosecuted. this is a case from nine years ago. all police officers know very well that they have a duty of confidentiality, a duty to protect personal information. that duty, in my view, clearly endures after you leave the service and so it is my view that what they have done, based on my understanding of what they are saying, what they have done
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is wrong and i condemn it. the most likely scenario is the man might be investigated for possible offences under the data protection act. there is a defence to that and that defence is disclosing information in the public interest. both men would argue that particularly neil lewis who said that he was prepared to give evidence to an enquiry into damian green‘s conduct, a cabinet office enquiry, that he has never been contacted enquiry, that he has never been co nta cted by enquiry, that he has never been contacted by the enquiry and he was concerned the enquiry would not lead to full facts which was one of the reasons he went public. thanks for the update at new scotland yard. nearly three—quarters of a million children and pensioners in the uk have fallen into relative poverty over the past four years. the left—leaning joseph rowntree foundation says it‘s the first sustained rise affecting these age groups for two decades.
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the government says the number of people living in absolute poverty has fallen by more than half a million since 2010. our social affairs correspondent michael buchanan has the details. for flo singleton, this drop—in centre has many benefits. she can meet friends, have a laugh, grab a bite to eat and by being here, the 84—year—old does not have to spend money heating her own home. if you go out, you don‘t have to have your heating on, do you? trouble is, once it‘s dark in the evenings now, and cold, you have to put your heating on, don‘t you? so you go on the bus just to keep warm? yeah. well, you know! yeah! it‘s lovely and warm on the bus. and then you sort of try and extend it as long as you can. even though you‘ve got to nowhere to go? yeah. it‘s mad, isn‘t it?
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today‘s report says that successful efforts to tackle poverty over the past 20 years are in danger of unravelling. it says that since 2013, an extra 300,000 pensioners and an additional 400,000 children are now living in poverty. in total, 14 million people in the uk are in poverty. what our report is now showing is that we are at a significant turning point. two years of sustained increases in the number of children and pensioners in poverty is a real red flag to government that they really have to do something now. absolute poverty, not having enough food or water to live on, has fallen by 500,000 since 2010. today‘s figures refer to relative poverty, having a lot less than most other people, and many researchers believe that is going to get worse. experts say the number of people living in poverty is likely to rise markedly in the coming years, particularly among children. wages, they say, will not
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keep pace with prices. benefits will remain frozen and housing costs are likely to increase. thejoseph rowntree foundation say ending the freeze on benefits would make the biggest difference to reducing poverty. ministers say they are already spending tens of billions of pounds each year helping those in need. caught in the middle are the poor themselves. that fellow keeps hassling me from the water company, because i haven‘t paid them. so i‘m going to have to dig into the funeral account. michael buchanan, bbc news. the east of england co—op will begin
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selling ten feet past the tax rebate. —— tinned food past the expiry date. the supermarket where they are busting the best before dates. the 125 east of england co—ops will sell items beyond their dates forjust10p each, saying waste not, want not. we tried giving it away. nobody wants you to give them anything. they expect to pay for it. customers are a bit suspicious when it is free but when you charge them 10p, people feel there is a transaction taking place and they‘re paying for something. we thought the product would last quite a while in the special display bins we have set up, but it lasted a couple of hours. nothing lasts more than a day now and the productjust sells through and the customers are really pleased about it. the aim is to do more to cut the quantity of food that is chucked out. the uk throws away over 7 million tonnes of it every year, and around £13 billion worth is edible. east of england co—op thinks it can save 50,000 items a year. this is what you are likely to see on supermarket food. if it is perishable, there will be a use by label.
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here it is the 10th of december, after which it is not safe to eat. if it is dried or tinned like this pasta, there will be a best before label, best before october 2019, so the quality after then might not be the best, but you can still eat it. of the bigger players, tesco says it puts discounts on food close to its best before dates and offers it to charities if it doesn‘t go. sainsbury donates it to local good causes. waitrose does that and sells some to staff at knock—down prices. the director of the anti—food waste group wrap welcomes the co—op‘s new approach. this is a really good step at the moment. let‘s see how the public responds, how their customers respond, and then think about what implications this could have for a wider roll—out. at the moment, the 10p food past its best before date is only for co—op customers in east anglia, but if the idea works,
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there‘s likely to be pressure on other supermarkets to do the same. simon gompertz, bbc news. an australian mp use the parliament debate on same—sex marriage the proposed to his boyfriend. there is a debate after the nationwide vote to legalise same—sex marriage. the mp was listening in the gallery when he got something of a surprise. for most people, a 20—hour debate on legislative amendments probably sounds like a bit of a turn—off. but for australian mp tim wilson, it provided the perfect opportunity for a little romance. this debate has been the soundtrack to our relationship. as his 13 minute speech reached its conclusion, he knew his chance had come. his voice started to falter as he turned to the public gallery. so there‘s only one thing left to do. ryan patrick bolger, will you marry me? chuck that in the memoirs
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on the hansard. i should let hansard note to record that was a yes, a resounding yes. congratulations. last month, a public vote in favour was celebrated with gusto after 62% of people supported the change. australia may have said i do, but there is still plenty of detail to be worked out. in parliament, the focus has been on religious freedom and the right of some people to opt out of working at a same—sex wedding, but the prime minister is still confident the bill will pass soon. few issues have divided australian politics in recent years as much as introducing same—sex marriage. today at least the debate managed to bring one couple closer together. hywel griffith, bbc news. pretty quiet to start the week, some
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prick changes way. some, sunny for others. taoiseach —— some big changes on the way. fine, dry weather but the middle of the week will turn wet and windy and thenit the week will turn wet and windy and then it will become dramatically colder and some of us will see some snow. here is the satellite picture from early on. the best of the sunshine was an east of areas, while cloud rolling into the west, and we will see some cloud generally speaking as we head into this evening at night. the thickest of that cloud possessing patchy rain and drizzle, if you get some rain in the cloud it could get a touch of frost but it will be mostly above freezing for most of us. into
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tomorrow, a quiet sort of day. large areas of cloud but some sunny spells, chiefly across central, southern and eastern area. up to the north—west, a subtle change, the wind strengthening, outbreaks of rain in north—west scotland and temperatures not doing too badly for this time of year, 8—10. for wednesday, the change is dramatic. wednesday, the change is dramatic. we see gales, outbreaks of rain in northern ireland, scotland and the west of england and wales. for most of us it will be a mild day but that will not last. through the middle of the week, the area of low pressure change things significantly, a spell of wet and windy weather on wednesday, then opens the floodgates to this very cold air which will plunge its way right down from the arctic. thursday could start off fairly mild and wet in the south—east but as the rain clears
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away, swinging the winds man to the north—west, bringing cold air in across the country, some wintry showers developing by this stage and it will turn possibly colder as the day:. afternoon temperatures 4—9d. on friday, yes some sunshine but it will be snow showers across western and eastern and northern areas. strong to gale force winds, even with sunshine, the thermometer will read 3—6d. it will feel subzero in many places. after the quiet start to the week, we will seek wet and windy weather and by the end of the week, it will be much colder. tonight at 6.00 — theresa may‘s mission to brussels —
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but she fails to break the deadlock in brexit talks. this was meant to be the day that opened the way to the next stage of brexit talks. some issues do remain that require further negotiation and consultation. ireland claims there was an agreement on the border question, but the dup has objected to the plan. we have been very clear. northern ireland must leave the european union on the same terms as the rest of the united kingdom. i'm surprised and disappointed that the british government now appears not to be ina british government now appears not to be in a position to conclude what was agreed earlier today. so will both sides make enough progress before

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